The Stranger

Blake left home years ago. Now, she is returning to make amends with her mom, but finds a stranger claiming to be her sister living in the house. As Blake begins to investigate, she realizes this stranger is turning people against her. Blake must prove she’s changed or lose everyone she loves.

Director’s Vision

There’s something fundamentally haunting about psychological thrillers. They’re chilling, not because they’re gruesome, but because they manifest immersive nightmares from a simple doubt and speak to morality through visceral physicality. Everyone has knocked on the actual or proverbial door of reconciliation, everyone has hurt someone they love. Mistakes are a fundamental element to human nature, but so is forgiveness – if allowed. However, in The Stranger, Blake is faced with the realization that, because of her mistakes, no one believes her. Not even her mother. This is one of my greatest fears: to hurt someone I love so deeply that not only do they distrust me, but they replace what we had with a delusion (or worse, forget me entirely) because of the damage I caused.