The Granite Man of Gilmour

After an extraterrestrial encounter in 1975, David Hamel embarked on a 30-year mission to build a flying saucer in his backyard, ultimately failing to do so yet leaving behind a mysterious legacy that only the residents of his small town can unravel.

Director’s Vision

I’m not a believer in UFOs. That might be hard to believe, considering the subject of this short film, but my interest in the film goes beyond the possibility of extraterrestrial existence, and whether or not flying saucers have visited Earth. What drew me to David Hamel’s story, and to the two other characters in this film, was Hamel’s dedication to his project, in the face of financial and social insecurity. I find something fascinating, and admirable, about people who dedicate their lives to something, even if – or especially because – they’re not sure if it will ever work out. So I’m hoping that viewers of this film take away from it a sense of wonder at Hamel’s vision, and at the effect he had on others, despite the fact that his flying saucer didn’t work. What I think this story is about, in the end, is the power of perseverance and seeing a vision through to the end.