Big Boy

Nine-year-old Dustin has never been allowed to use a public bathroom on his own. Now, in the middle of the night, at what appears to be a deserted highway rest stop, his parents permit him to go in alone where he encounters unforeseen dangers that take surprising and hilarious turns.

Director’s Statement

I enjoy darkly funny stories. Especially when they flirt with the perverse as BIG BOY does. But what I find most compelling about this story is its core theme: childhood innocence has power. I first heard the term “helicopter parent” while casting this film. It refers to a parent that hovers around their children, safeguarding them from trouble. That was not the parenting style that guided my childhood. My parents definitely gave me latitude to play, explore the world and often fall into some precarious situations. I always managed to return home unscathed and I attribute that to the power of my own innocence. I don’t know if the world’s dangers are greater now than they were when I was growing up, but I am hopeful that today’s children, possessing the same intangible forces I did, would find their way safely home to their parents as well.