These two works were devised as a duo of Lynchian films specifically connected to the Far North of Australia. The low-lying tropical rivers, abandoned farms, sports culture, and cane fields make both an eerie yet strongly personal setting.

Director’s Vision for ‘Dollar Bill Blues and Waiting Around to Die’

Cairns in my youth was a world of lingering humidity, mangrove swamps, sports fanatics, muddy driveways, a natural distrust of outsiders.. My home in this northern humid environment was normalised and the complexity of its history, are still the topic of much of my work.

Is it possible the isolated people of the north created a non-secular world for themselves, one that battles against the dark encompassing swamps that border them at all sides? The corruption of youth living alongside the rejection of modern ideals. The drama of protecting one’s soul from hazard is the focus of the two stories portrayed here in this double feature of music videos for SHOGUN AND THE SHEETS. Both songs covers of John Townes Van Zandt.

Tim ‘Shogun’ Wall came onto the scene with the Sydney band Royal Headache, this outfit is his new reincarnation. In an early 2019 interview with FBI radio, Shogun outlined his own internal conflicts which laid the bedrock for the double feature.

‘I grew up in the late 80s and early 90s… I think politically switched-on kids today would think it was a casual horror movie in so many regards – it was just disgusting… And now I think masculinity is in flux because we know we’ve screwed up. But I think we’re being asked to kind of be incredibly numb and strong and kind of handle lots and lots of critique, but to [also] still retain this sort of invincibility we were suppose to have which the problem in the first place.’

These films sets the drama of this cultural contradiction against the north’s steamy corrosive landscapes indifferent to the goodwill of its residents.